Finding Alaska

 

“Our good friend Ken onboard Island Rover said we’d need to penetrate the ice-flows calving from the John Hopkins Glacier if we wanted to somehow reach the huge Marjorie Glacier. He said it wouldn’t be easy. It wasn’t easy, but we did it, we did it by following the National Geographic vessel Sea Bird which cut a convenient path for us through the pack-ice. Once through this frozen barrier an incredible world opened up; we were all alone in this wild wilderness.”

Dave

We’ve produced a five minute video trailer of our sailing adventure from Hoonah on remote Chigacoff Island to the depths of Glacier Bay. We were joined by our best friend and step-brother Gary Cole who assisted in the filming of our amazing voyage… it’s a fascinating insight into wild Alaska.

Our full thirty minute long production will be released shortly. Please view our trailer for ‘FINDING ALASKA’… and please don’t forget to add your YouTube ‘Like’. You can also subscribe (free) to our newly launched SV Sänna YouTube Channel.

We have a series of video productions in the making, each detailing our liveaboard experience whilst in Alaska and British Columbia. These include ‘Bear Hunters of Alaska’, our planned filming this coming year of the extensive grizzly bear population on Chichagof Island and ‘Finding the Aleutians’, recording our anticipated voyage to the extremely remote Alaskan Aleutian Islands as we head north to the Arctics’ Northwest Passage.

We always appreciate your support!


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2 thoughts on “Finding Alaska

  1. What a wonderful way to end my first full day back in Newfoundland, watching your video of Glacier Bay. A great experience for you all. I wonder if there were other ships in the vicinity apart from the National Geographic vessel, or did you have the whole area to yourselves? Beautiful.

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    1. Thank you Mary, it was so nice to see you again last week. Glacier Bay is huge… nearly fifty miles deep! We saw very few vessels but we did come across a cruise ship, the Amsterdam. We can’t complain about that tho because Marie called them up on the VHF when we were stuck in the ice. They were heading south from the glaciers and advised us to head over to the east side where there was less ice and there we came across National Geographic’s Sea Bird. Other than that we saw nothing and were totally alone for most of the time. It has to rank as one of our most amazing experiences.

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